The Voices Of Children: Lessons Learned While Listening

While visiting the Diana School in Reggio Emilia in 1997,  I saw a little triptych posted outside a classroom, on which there were hand-written notes and drawings describing the children’s day for parents to read. I suddenly realized that there was, in that triptych, tremendous potential for documenting children’s process and thinking in an immediate, yet still fairly deep, way. From that point forward, I  kept a “daily log” of the group process in our classroom. I found these logs indispensable to the process of teacher research. Soon I realized that those moments of brilliance that were documented in the log were too good to keep to myself. I began to share them with parents, as attachments in email. Finding this method of dissemination problematic (only some of the parents could access the log), I tried every form of technology as it came available to me over the years: writing in Netscape, with Dreamweaver, with iWeb. When blogging became popular, the concept and infrastructure finally coincided, and what was once a private blog for only the parents and teachers at our school could then become public. I invite you into our world of one thousand moments…of the lessons we adults can learn from the voices of children. Thank you for reading!

 

 

The Study Protocol

Of all the “one hundred languages of children,” drawing is among both the most accessible and, for some children, the most powerful. I have known many verbally gifted five-year-olds, and none of them could do justice to her biggest ideas through words. Drawing,...

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What Does “Reggio-Inspired” Mean?

Allie is three years old. She is highly verbal. She amazes her parents, Paul and Michelle, with her language, her insightful questions and her observations on a daily basis. Paul and Michelle are pretty sure she’s smart, and creative, too. They are looking for a...

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Exercising Voice On An Ordinary Day

What does it mean for a young child to find her voice? We are witness, in so many ways,  to the miraculous process in which children realize that they have their own agendas, and that, though they have to work within the parameters adults set to keep them safe...

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What Is Your “Why?”

I am reading Simon Stipek’s Start With Why (Penguin Group 2009). As often happens, at least to me, the book I am reading is in dialogue not only with my mind, but also with those who have been on my mind. After many years at the same school, my “why’s” are suddenly no...

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The Poetry Of Children’s Photography

During a rainy-day trip to “our” forest in October, the children used a digital camera to take pictures of whatever interested them.      It is always a gift to see the world through the children’s eyes. Upon viewing the photos, I found...

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Early Flow Of Ideas Through Representation

With only a week of school under their belts, the children gave us a lovely window into the role contagion can play in first explorations of representation. Over the course of two days, we adults were witness to a flow of ideas from child to child, and from medium to...

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Introducing A New EBook By Pam Oken-Wright

INTRODUCING a new EBook (my first in ePub format) that tells the story of an unexpected long-term investigation of five-year-old girls. Just click the link at the top of the page to view the book. Please check it out and let me know what you...

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